Master Degree

Master Degree

The Master Degree -Facts every aspirant should know

A Master is an advanced degree conferred by universities around the world for completion of graduate study in a specific discipline. Masters degree programs typically take one to two years to complete and further prepare graduates for a career in their chosen field. Obtaining a Masters degree offers numerous professional, personal and academic benefits to students who have graduated from a Bachelor program.

Masters degrees are available across various fields of study, including the Arts, Business, Engineering and Technology, Law, Humanities, Social Sciences, Biological and Life Sciences, and the Natural Sciences. Within each of those fields of study, numerous practical specializations are available within particular disciplines.

India

In the Indian system, a master's degree is a postgraduate degree following a Bachelor's degree and preceding a Doctorate, usually requiring two years to complete. The available degrees include but are not limited to the following:

  • Master of Arts (M.A.)
  • Master of Social Work (MSW)
  • Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.)
  • Master of Computer Applications (M.C.A.)
  • Master of Engineering (M.Eng.)
  • Master of Philosophy (M.Phil.)
  • Master of Science (M.Sc.)
  • Master of Technology (M.Tech.)
  • Master of Statistics (M.Stat.)
  • Master of Laws (LL.M.)
  • Master of Commerce (M.Com.)
  • Master of Architecture (M.Arch.)
  • Master of Veterinary Science (MVSc

History :

The master's degree dates back to the origin of European universities, with a Papal bull of 1233 decreeing that anyone admitted to the mastership in the University of Toulouse should be allowed to teach freely in any other university. The original meaning of the master's degree was thus that someone who had been admitted to the rank (degree) of master (i.e. teacher) in one university should be admitted to the same rank in other universities. This gradually became formalised as the licentia docendī (licence to teach). Originally, masters and doctors were not distinguished, but by the 15th century it had become customary in the English universities to refer to the teachers in the lower faculties (arts and grammar) as masters and those in the higher faculties as doctors. Initially, the Bachelor of Arts (BA) was awarded for the study of the trivium and the Master of Arts (MA) for the study of the quadrivium.

From the late Middle Ages until the nineteenth century, the pattern of degrees was therefore to have a bachelor's and master's degree in the lower faculties and to have bachelor's and doctorates in the higher faculties. In the United States, the first master's degrees (Magister Artium, or Master of Arts) were awarded at Harvard University soon after its foundation. In Scotland, the pre-Reformation universities (St Andrews, Glasgow, and Aberdeen) developed so that the Scottish MA became their first degree, while in Oxford, Cambridge and Trinity College, Dublin, the MA was awarded to BA graduates of a certain standing without further examination from the late seventeenth century, its main purpose being to confer full membership of the university. At Harvard the 1700 regulations required that candidates for the master's degree had to pass a public examination, but by 1835 this was awarded Oxbridge-style three years after the BA.

Master's degrees are commonly titled using the form 'Master of ...', where either a faculty (typically Arts or Science) or a field (Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Business Administration, etc.) is specified. The two most common titles of master's degrees are the Master of Arts (MA/M.A./A.M) and Master of Science (MSc/M.Sc./M.S./S.M.) degrees, which normally consist of a mixture of research and taught material.

The title of Master of Philosophy (MPhil) indicates (in the same manner as Doctor of Philosophy) an extended degree with a large research component. Other generically named master's programs include the Master of Studies (MSt)/Master of Advanced Study (MASt)/Master of Advanced Studies (M.A.S.), and Professional Master's (MProf). Integrated master's degrees and postgraduate master's degrees oriented towards professional practice are often more specifically named for their field of study ("tagged degrees"), including, for example, Master of Business Administration, Master of Divinity, Master of Engineering and Master of Physics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Features of the course

Best Lab

Best Teachers

Low Cost Services